How to Write a Damn Good Mystery

This is an indispensable step-by-step guide for anyone who's ever dreamed of writing a damn good mystery.

How to Write a Damn Good Mystery

How to Write a Damn Good Mystery

Edgar award nominee James N. Frey, author of the internationally best-selling books on the craft of writing, How to Write a Damn Good Novel, How to Write a Damn Good Novel II: Advanced Techniques, and The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth, has now written what is certain to become the standard "how to" book for mystery writing, How to Write a Damn Good Mystery. Frey urges writers to aim high-not to try to write a good-enough-to-get-published mystery, but a damn good mystery. A damn good mystery is first a dramatic novel, Frey insists-a dramatic novel with living, breathing characters-and he shows his readers how to create a living, breathing, believable character who will be clever and resourceful, willful and resolute, and will be what Frey calls "the author of the plot behind the plot." Frey then shows, in his well-known, entertaining, and accessible (and often humorous) style , how the characters-the entire ensemble, including the murderer, the detective, the authorities, the victims, the suspects, the witnesses and the bystanders-create a complete and coherent world. Exploring both the on-stage action and the behind-the-scenes intrigue, Frey shows prospective writers how to build a fleshed-out, believable, and logical world. He shows them exactly which parts of that world show up in the pages of a damn good mystery-and which parts are held back just long enough to keep the reader guessing. This is an indispensable step-by-step guide for anyone who's ever dreamed of writing a damn good mystery.

More Books:

How to Write a Damn Good Novel
Language: en
Pages: 174
Authors: James N. Frey
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 1987-12-15 - Publisher: Macmillan

Covers characterization, plot, theme, conflicts, climax and resolution, point of view, dialogue, revision, and manuscript submission
How to Write a Damn Good Mystery
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: James N. Frey
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-04-01 - Publisher: St. Martin's Press

Edgar award nominee James N. Frey, author of the internationally best-selling books on the craft of writing, How to Write a Damn Good Novel, How to Write a Damn Good Novel II: Advanced Techniques, and The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth, has now
How to Write a Damn Good Thriller
Language: en
Pages: 306
Authors: James N. Frey
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-03-30 - Publisher: St. Martin's Press

A quick look at any fiction bestseller list reveals that thrillers make up most of the titles at the top. HOW TO WRITE A DAMN GOOD THRILLER will help the aspiring novelist or screenwriter to design, draft, write, and polish a thriller that is sure to grab readers. Frey uses
The Art of the Traditional Short Story
Language: en
Pages: 298
Authors: Lester Gorn, James N. Frey
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher: Bearcat Press

Fourteen Short Stories by master Storytellers, James N. Frey and Lester Gorn.
Will Write for Food
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Dianne Jacob
Categories: Cooking
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-07-14 - Publisher: Hachette UK

The go-to soup-to-nuts guide on how to really make money from food writing, both in print and online With recipe-driven blogs, cookbooks, reviews, and endless foodie websites, food writing is ever in demand. In this award-winning guide, noted journalist and writing instructor Dianne Jacob offers tips and strategies for getting

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